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Perkins Research Nebraska Biographical Sketches
 



PERKINS & LEAR, new and second-hand furniture and stoves, 1416 Douglas street, Omaha. Established in 1880. Mr. Perkins is a native of Vermont, and came here in 1873 and engaged in the mercantile industries of this place, with which he has been identified since. In 1881 he was married to Miss SALLY V. HICKMAN, who was born in Illinois. The firm are active and progressive and fully alive to the requirements of the times.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


J. W. Arnold, bookkeeper, was born in Pennsylvania in 1841. In 1861 became West, and after spending six years on the plains he went to Kentucky, when, after a short stay he returned to Omaha, and has been connected with his industry here since. October 18, 1871, he was married to Miss EMILY E. PERKINS, who was born in Hudson, Mich., in 1847. They have a family of one son, Gilbert Warren, the youngest, and two daughters, Cassie May and Inez Maria. In 1879 Mrs. Arnold, who had for several years previous attended to floriculture, was prevailed upon to open a business in that line, aud her trade has been so very prosperous that she now proposes to enlarge upon her favorite industry and do a wholesale business, in which her unremitting attention must command the attention of dealers in flowers.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


ALONZO PERKINS, County Judge, is a native of Waterloo, NY.; came to La Salle County, Ill, in 1844; came to Nebraska in 1856 and brought a portable saw mill, which he run six or seven years, then removed to Omaha and was engaged in the hotel business about one year; he then removed to Fontenelle, where he followed farming until 1877, when he was elected County Judge; he represented this county in the Territorial Legislature in 1857; was elected County Commissioner in 1867, and served three years; he has also held the office of Postmaster, Justice of the Peace, and various other offices. Mr. Perkins also served twelve months in the Mexican War.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.

**Also See: Source: Portland, Oregon, Its History and Builders: In Connection with the ..., Volume 2 -  By Joseph Gaston (1911)


ALFRED PERKINS, of the hardware firm of Saunders & Perkins, Blue Springs, Neb., was born in Greig, Lewis County, N.Y., in 1846. In 1864, enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Eighty-sixth New York Infantry, and was at the battle of Petersburg, Va ; and in a number of skirmishes, and was mustered out of the service in June, 1865, when he returned to New York and farmed until 1872, when he moved to Nebraska and located at Blue Springs and engaged in general merchandising for four years. In 1 Rl, he, in connection with A. V. S. Saunders, went into the hardware business; was married in 1870 to Miss EMMA J. GAYLORD, of Lewis County, N. Y. They have five children living; is a member of Tyre Lodge, No. 85, A., F. & A. M., Blue Springs, Neb.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


J.R. PERKINS, steam and gas fitter, agent of Hay & Prentice's steam heating apparatus, of Chicago. He makes a specialty of boiler and engine setting, and has the most complete set of tools in the state. He lately completely renewed the heating apparatus at the State Insane Asylum. Mr. Perkins was born in Delaware County, N.Y., July 2nd, 1835. His parents moved to Hartwick, N.Y., when he was young. He left home in 1848 and commenced learning his trade in Oneonta, N.Y. He then engaged in the locomotive department of the N.Y.C.R.R., and had charge of an engine for several years. He enlisted Aug. 5th, 1862, in Company L, First New York Mounted Rifles, and served until mustered out in 1865. During the most of this time he was attached to the Provost Marshal's office, detached on special duty. He returned to New York at the close of the war, and shortly after removed to Freeport, Ill, where he resided until he came to Nebraska in 1881. He followed steam and gas fitting in Freeport. He was married in South Valley, Otsego Co., N.Y., October 20th, 1858, to Miss CHLOE L. BUTLER, a daughter of Thomas Butler, an old resident of that county. They have one child, Lillie A. Perkins. Mr. Perkins is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Chapter, Council and Commandery.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


MARK A. PERKINS, physician and surgeon, was born in Wayne County, N.C., June 23rd, 1838. He studied medicine at New Garden, Guilford County, under Dr. Samuel D. Coffin, and began the practice of medicine in 1862, at Pikeville, N.C., where he remained for a year, engaged in that capacity; then in Dublin, Wayne Co., Ind, for four years; then in Pikeville, N.C., off and on for several years. He went to Cartersville, Darlington Co., S.C., where he practiced, carried on a turpentine factory and was engaged in mercantile business, residing there some six years; subsequently practiced and farmed in Richland County, S. C., for four years. The Doctor came to Glenville May 7th, 1881, and at once began to practice. On June 1st, 1882, he purchased a drug store, which he conducts in connection with is practice.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


SOLOMON PERKINS, farmer, Section 18, Town 15, Range 3 east, Franklin Precinct, P.O. David City. This gentleman came to Nebraska in 1869, and located on Section 22, Town 16, Range 3 eat, in Bone Creek Precinct, and was the first man to settle near what is known as the Platte Bluffs, in Butler county. Here he took up a homestead, where he continued to live, pursuing his farming for thirteen years, then moved to the place where he now lives, where he has a fine farm of 240 acres. Mr. Perkins was one of the original members of the First Baptist Church Society of Butler county. Was married in Warren County, Iowa, to Miss SARAH M. JACKSON, daughter of William Jackson, who was also one of the early settlers of Butler county. Mr. Perkins was born in Illinois November 6th, 1846. He enlisted at Indianola, Iowa, in Company A, in the Forty-eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in 1864, and served until the close of the war. They have three children, viz. William L. Perkins, Elvannah Perkins, she being one of the first children born in Butler county, Ivan S. Perkins, all of whom are now living. They also had one daughter, Mary, who died in March, 1874. This is one of the families that suffered as all settlers did at the time of the grasshopper plagues, droughts, etc.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


HON. BENJAMIN O. PERKINS, retired farmer, real estate dealer at David City. He came to Nebraska in the year 1869, and located in Butler county, Bone Creek Precinct, Section 4, near the village of Savannah, then the county seat of Butler county. Here he resided until the fall of 1870, when he was elected to the office of Probate Judge of Butler county, and was also the second Probate Judge-elect of Butler county. Upon taking his seat of office, he moved to Savannah, in which official duty he served two terms. In the fall of 1873, when the county seat was moved to David City, Mr. Perkins was compelled to move his family to the above office, and abandoned his farming, and has continued to take up his abode there since, and has always been an active worker in the general interest of the country and town. He also served as the first Mayor of David City, when the town received her city charter, which she held for two years, and then went back to the old town charter. Mr. Perkins is a native of Illinois, being born in Morgan County, January 3, 1825, but was raised and educated in Iowa. He was married, in Warren County, Iowa, to Miss MAGGIE A. WILSON, of that state, by whom he has brought up a family of three children - Minnie, Maggie and Bennie. Mr. Perkins is a member of the I.O.O.F. Harmony Lodge, No. 31, of David City, and also the Temple of Honor.

Source: History of the state of Nebraska : Containing A full account of its growth from an uninhabited territory to a wealthy and important state; of its early settlements; its rapid increased in population, and the marvelous development of its great natural resources. Also an extended description of its COUNTIES, CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, Their advantages, industries, manufactures and commerce; Biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and Early Settlers; Views of residents and business Blocks, Cities and Towns; p.585. Chicago: The Western Historical Company; A. T. Andreas, Proprietor, 1882.


S. (SOLOMON) A. PERKINS - Prominent among the vigorous real-estate dealers of Custer County, one who has been rewarded with marked success during the six years that he has followed this line of business is S. A. Perkins, member of the firm of Houghton Perkins, of Arnold. Prior to his entrance upon the filed of real estate, Mr. Perkins was engaged in farming, and in each of these connections with the soil, whether in Custer county or elsewhere, he has been able to make the most of his opportunities and to gain a satisfying share of prosperity through his transactions. Mr. Perkins was born in Monroe county, Iowa, September 16th, 1866, and is a son of Elisha M. and Sarah (Strickland) Perkins. He was but four years of age when brought by his father to Butler county, Nebraska, the father taking up a homestead ten miles north of David City, on the present site of Octavia. The youth grew up amid agricultural surroundings and was taught the routine business of the farm by a father who was industrious and who demanded that his son be also, so that the summer months usually found S. A. Perkins actively identified with the occupations of the farm, and when he was not attending the district school, during the winter terms, he was generally attending the school of hard work and sturdy experience, in the summers. He remained under the parental roof until shortly after he had attained his twenty-first birthday, and October 13, 1887, at Swan, Iowa, he was united in marriage to Miss NINA PALMER, who likewise was born in that state, a daughter of William and Martha (Thomas) Palmer, well known and highly respected people there. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins have one son, Glen O. Perkins, who is one of the energetic young business men of Arnold, where he is cashier of the Arnold State Bank. GLEN O. PERKINS married Miss ETHEL COLLINS, and they are the parents of two daughters. After his marriage Mr. Perkins settled down to farming in Butler county, and there he continued operations with increasing success until 1906, when he glimpsed an opportunity and, grasping it, came to Custer county and purchased 640 acres of land, situated three miles east of Arnold. There he continued to farm until 1912, his industry, experience, and good management gaining him marked success as an agriculturist. In 1912 he left the farm and moved to Arnold, where he established himself in the real-estate, insurance, and loan business, continuing alone until 1917, when he formed a partnership with P.G. Houghton, under the firm name of Houghton & Perkins. This alliance has continued successfully to the present time, and is accounted a strong and important business combination, through which some important transactions have been brought to a successful and satisfactory conclusion. Mr. Perkins is well informed as to land values in this locality, having made a through study of the situation, and since entering the real-estate field he has done much to assist in the upbuilding of this part of Custer county. He has supreme faith in the future of the locality and his entire satisfaction with the soil here, is evidenced by his retaining ownership of his farming land and by the fact that he has made plans to continue in the real-estate business indefinitely. He is a stockholder and director of the Arnold State Bank, is a Republican in his political allegiance, and is prominently affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has received the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also of a noble of the Mystic Shrine.

Source: History of Custer County, Nebraska : a narrative of the past with special emphasis upon the pioneer period of the county's history, its social, commercial, educational, religious, and civic development from the early days to the present time. Gaston, William Levi; Humphrey, Augustin R.; Lincoln, NE, Western Publishing and Engraving Company, 1919.


J. S. PERKINS was born in Alleghany County, Maryland, September 9th, 1847, whence his parents removed to Virginia, when he was six years of age. There he was educated and entered the Sixth West Virginia Infantry and served through two years of the Civil War. October 10th, 1867, he married Miss MARY SAYRE to whom was born one son. He is a staunch Republican, having voted the ticket when in the army at the age of seventeen. He was County Assessor in West Virginia for eight years and is now Sheriff of Frontier County, NE.

Source: Semi-centennial history of Nebraska; historical sketch (1904)


WILLIS P. PERKINS, manager and grain buyer for the Nebraska City Elevator Company of Union, NE, is a man of large experience and a fine capacity for business. He has been a resident of this point since the establishment of the elevator here in November, 1887, and he has been connected with the company for twelve years, and has never lost a day in their service, and for his intelligent management of their interest and his fidelity, the company trust him implicitly, and consider him one of their most valuable employees. The elevator, of which he has control, has a capacity of 8,000 bushels, and is kept well filled all of the time. Mr. Perkins is well and favorably known by the citizens of this community, and by the grain raisers throughout the county. He was one of the pioneers of 1856, settling then in Nebraska City, NE and has made his home there a great deal of the time since until coming here. He has been variously engaged as a farmer, freighter, grain dealer, etc., and has had a rich and varied experience of life on the frontier and on the plains, and is perfectly familiar with the history of those early days when the country was new, when Indians were numerous, white settlements few and scattering, and there being no railways, goods were carried on the water courses from point to point, or, where rivers were not available, a long and weary distance across the seemingly endless plains, that were then looked upon as for the most part, barren and fruitless. It has been the privilege of our subject to watch the great change that has been wrought by the energetic hand of man in turning this part of the so-called "Great American Desert" into a fruitful land, teeming with wealth and busy life, and he may be proud to think that he, too, assisted in its development. He first began life here as a business man, and in the fall of 1859 had his first experience as a freighter, crossing the plains with the first load of apples ever shipped to Denver, Colorado. To the little band of settlers on the banks of Cherry Creek, famishing for the good things that they had left behind them as welcome as if they had been plucked from the Gardens of the Hesperides, and they readily gave $2.50 to $3.00 a dozen for the luscious fruit. Mr. Perkins followed that trip up by many others, making forty trips in all, the longest one to Salt Lake City, UT, and the last one was made in August, 1865. His journeying to and fro were made with the Indians were on the rampage, but he fortunately eluded their clutches and met with but little loss from their hands, save a few oxen or cattle. During the five years that he was engaged as a freighter across the great plains he became as familiar with the various trails and routes as with the streets of his own town, and made an extensive acquaintance among the large number of people who were journeying in search of gold. Mr. Perkins next venture was to engage in the lumber and wood business on the Missouri River, and in that he met with a good degree of success. After that he spent some time in Lancaster county, NE as a farmer, but he lost his crops, which were destroyed by grasshoppers, and his experiment in that direction was a decided failure. Notwithstanding his misfortune, he did not lose his ambition or his courage, but tried something else. He later turned his attention again to freighting, and made two trips to the Black Hills from Sioux City, Iowa. He made considerable money in that way, and thus righted his financial condition. On the occasion of his last trip to the hills, he met the renowned Gen. Custer, who advised him to leave the hills, as he did not consider it safe for civilians, on account of the Indians of that region, and our subject wisely took his counsel and returned to his old home in Nebraska City, and at that time he became connected with the company that he how represents. We will now give a brief resume of the early life of our subject. He was born in Xenia, Ohio, September 16th, 1839, to Thomas M. and Mary J. (Parkenson) Perkins. His parents are now dead, having died in Nebraska City, NE where they had settled in 1856, the father dying at the age of fifty, in the latter part of the fifties, and his wife on year later, at the age of forty-nine. They were old-time Methodists in religion, and the father was a Whig in politics. They were natives of Greene County, Ohio, and were there reared and married, and Mr. Perkins was quite extensively engaged in the mercantile business for many years. He visited California twice, and was there engaged in mining to some extent. He of whom we write was the first son and child of five children, two sons and three daughters, born to his parents. In his boyhood he went to Iowa with his parents, and was one of the clerks in the establishment which were managed by his father and others, his headquarters being at Eldora, Harding Co., IA and also at Oskaloosa, in Mahaska Co., Iowa. He finished his education in Mt. Pleasant, Henry Co., Iowa. After leaving his father's employ he engaged in business on his own account for some time in Plum Hollow, Freemont Co., Iowa, ere he came to Nebraska, NE. The marriage of our subject to Miss GERTRUDE W. WOOD took place in Nebraska City, NE. Mrs. Perkins was born in Roy, N.J. in 1843, and was the daughter of Daniel and Mary (Rich) Wood, natives of the Eastern States. They were married in New York City, NY where Mr. Wood was engaged extensively for some years in shipping flour. In 1856 he came with his family to Nebraska, and was engaged in the manufacture of lumber in Nebraska City for some time. About 1866 he and his family went to Lancaster County, NE, and there he farmed it the rest of his days, twelve miles from Lincoln, NE, his death occurring in 1875, at the age of sixty-eight. In this time he has been an active business man of much acuteness and capacity. His wife survived him until December, 1888, when she too, passed beyond, at her home in Nebraska City, NE, at the advanced age of eighty-one years. They were active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Perkins was carefully trained by good parents in all that goes to make a true woman. She received her education in Nebraska City, NE, having accompanied her parents to that place in her girlhood. To her and her husband have been born eleven children, one of whom, Emery Perkins, died at the age of three years. Those living are: Minnie E. Perkins, Horace M. Perkins and Edith Perkins are at home; Ida Perkins, is the wife of Harry Hugo, of Shenandoah, Iowa; Elizabeth Perkins, Thomas Perkins, Lula Perkins, Ella Perkins, Bessie Perkins and Roy Perkins are all at home. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins are people of high merit, and are held in consideration by their many friends. Mr. Perkins is a sound Democrat, and never hesitates to express his views on proper occasions.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Album of Otoe and Cass Counties, Nebraska ..., Part 2
 


M. V. PERKINS, another pioneer settler of Highland township, came to Adams County, Nebraska, in April, 1873, settled on the farm where he now resides, and there he has since made his home. He first homesteaded eighty acres in Section 22, Highland Township, and this he has improved, added to and cultivated, until he has one of the best farms in the county. He was born in Bureau County, Ill, in 1837, and was the eldest of four children born to Timothy and Cynthia (Perkins) Perkins, natives of Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. Timothy Perkins went with his parents to Illinois at an early day, and was reared to the arduous duties of the farm. He was married in Bureau County, Ill, and there engaged in agricultural pursuits. He took an active part in politics, and was a soldier in the Blackhawk War. His death occurred in 1865, and the mother's death occurred a number of years previous. Being reared to farm life, it was but natural, perhaps, that when it became time for M. V. Perkins to start out in life for himself, he chose that as his calling, although previous to this, however, he had made a journey to California (1864), overland, was five months on the road, and following mining there until 1866, when he returned to Illinois and engaged in tilling the soil, which has been his principal occupation since. He was married in his native county in 1860 to Mrs. ELIZA (BLACKBURN), a native of Nodaway County, MO, and the daughter of Jesse Blackburn, a native of Kentucky, and one of the pioneers of Maryville, MO. Mr. Blackburn was a farmer by occupation, and died many years ago. M. V. Perkins cultivated the soil in Bureau County, Ill, until coming to Adams County, NE, in 1873. He has a good substantial buildings on his place, and the original eighty acres have been increased to 160 acres, all of which is in tillable condition. He raises considerable stock, and makes a specialty of blooded animals, having a fine grade of Norman horses and short-horn cattle, and taken all in all, he is one of the enterprising and progressive men of the county. He is a Democrat, and active in politics. Mr. Perkins aided in the organization of the township, is a member of the school board, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church at Hastings, Nebraska. To their union were born nine children: William Perkins, Isabell Perkins, Jane Perkins, Jesse Perkins (married and resides in the township), Martin Perkins, Fred Perkins, Lindsey Perkins, Ada Perkins and Emma Perkins. Mr. Perkins has seen the full and complete development of the county, and has killed buffalo near his farm. Hastings was but a small place when he first settled here, and it seems to have grown up like magic. He has aided in all enterprises for the good of the county, particularly so in educational matters. He is practically a self-made man, all his property being the result of his own exertions.

Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Adams, Clay, Hall and Hamilton Counties, Nebraska. Goodspeed (1890)
 


 

Joel Dobbs, one of the enterprising, progressive and prosperous mercantile houses of the growing town of Rockford, NE, in the township of that same name, is that of Messrs. Dobbs & Willis, and in this epitome is briefly sketched the life of the popular senior partner of the firm, a man of education and ability, who owns his present position almost entirely to his own ambition. He is the son of Russell L. and Cynthia (Hurst) Dobbs, natives respectively of Tennessee and Indiana. The loyal patriotism of his grandfather led him to take up arms in his country's defense in the War of 1812, and fire from the same altar still burns in the breast of our subject. The Dobbs family came to America over 150 years since, and settled in Tennessee among the Blue Ridge Mountains, in the days when the State was just being opened up. In this district the family grew and flourished; generation followed generation in their life among these beautiful hills. The parents of our subject were married in Putnam County, Ind., in 1837, and the father remained following the chosen calling of his life until 1844, when he removed to Andrew County, MO., and was among the early pioneers of that district, and still lives upon the old farm. He has attained the advanced age of seventy-one years, but does not seem to feel their weight pressing so heavily as many do at a lesser number. He still enjoys good health and is active, still able to perform a great deal of work on and about the farm. In his time he has held many important offices, and has been an active politician. The mother of our subject died in the year 1867, aged forty-eight years. They were the parents of nine children, whose names are recorded as follows; Emeline, Abraham, John, Ameila Jane, Martha, Sarah, Julia, William F. and Joel. by a former marriage there were born to the father of our subject two children, who received the names respectively of Mary and Susan. Mr. Joel Dobbs was born July 23rd, 1857, upon the old homestead in Missouri. His first great trouble came with the death of his mother when he was ten years of age. At eleven he started to do battle with the world on his own account, and has from that time continued to do so. After the death of his wife, the father of our subject was unable to attend to business on account of sickness causes by his wife's death, for two years, owing to the severe strain caused by that trouble. This was the immediate cause of our subject and the rest of the family being thrown upon their own resources. Until he was eighteen years of age our subject continued to work upon a farm, and it was his practice during winter especially to work for his board in order that he might attend school. At eighteen years of age he began teaching school in Andrew and Nodaway Counties, and continued successfully in this profession for nine years, interspersing it, however, during his vacations with work in connection with mercantile life, and by farming upon rented land, and although he was compelled from the nature of his other engagements to employ hired help in its cultivation, he realized quite a good profit. The sentiments of Miss ALICE E. PERKINS and our subject being found upon inquiry to be in perfect accord, they became husband and wife March 17th, 1878. This lady is the daughter of Avery A. and Martha (Abbott) Perkins, natives of Kentucky and Ohio. As the name intimates, the Perkins family are of English extraction; they settled in this country in an early day. Upon their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Perkins settled in Hancock County, IL, in 1840, where he followed the occupation of agricultural pursuits until 1872, when he removed to Nodaway County, MO. Of this union there were born ten children, whose names were recorded as follows; John S. Perkins, Ephraim Perkins, Lucina Perkins, Jane Perkins, Edith Perkins, Alice E. Perkins, Nancy Perkins, Annie Perkins, Avery A. Perkins and George Perkins, deceased. By a former wife there were born four other children. Mrs. Dobbs was born in Hancock County, in the state of Illinois, in April, 1858, and continued to live with her parents until her marriage. She was fifteen years of age when she accompanied her parents to Missouri, and there she made the acquaintance of our subject while he was engaged in teaching. Until the year 1883 they continued to live in Missouri, then came to Nebraska and settled upon a farm four miles north of Blue Springs, where our subject continued engaged in farming for two years. Then he came to Rockford, NE and established the business which still engages his attention; from that time on there has been a continuous and steady increase in the business, so that other help was required and a larger stock demanded. He has, however, been enabled to keep pace with this most desirable and happy grown, and will doubtless contrive to do so, however far it may extend in the future. Our subject has erected a very pretty and commodious residence in Rockford, NE, and has supplied it with numberless conveniences that are a daily appreciation. Although no pains have been spared to make this home bright and pleasant, its chief adornment to our subject is his wife and children. They have been born of this union six children, three of whom died in childhood. Their names are as follows: William S. , Annie, who died age nine months, Bernice, Russell L. , who died when three years of age, Elmer, and an infant who died unnamed. To Mr. Dobbs came the honor of being appointed the first Postmaster of Rockford, NE , a position which he filled with universal satisfaction within the sphere of operation. He was elected Justice of the Peace in the year 1887, and there won fresh laurels. This was, doubtless, one reason why he was made a delegate to the Republican County Convention of 1888. It will be seen, therefore , that the current of his political principles and sentiments is with the "grand old party", of which for many years he has been a stanch friend. These things are but effects; the cause must be sought in the character of the man, who has achieved such success and gathered around him so many friends, who hold him in their high regard.

Source: Portrait and biographical album of Gage County, Nebraska, containing full page portraits and biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens of the county. 1888
 


 

 

                              


  

                                                                                             

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